Charity Matters Feb/Mar 2018 ISSUE 77. Thank you for your continued support, you can find more articles on eZinematters.com

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Charitymatters

Charity Matters is a free eZine, published every two months, which we think you will find a useful and informative resource.
News

DAMAGE
The charity sector has suffered considerable and probably permanent damage due to the recent slew of sleaze allegations aimed at a few large organisations.

In Haiti it has been reported that some Oxfam staff organised orgies in a villa in Port au Prince, with women offered aid for sex after the 2010 earthquake there.in the "culture of entitlement" that apparently existed at Oxfam. As a result Haiti has banned Oxfam GB while it investigates the allegations, including those claiming that some of the prostitutes were 14 years old. The age of consent in Haiti is 18.

Since the story broke donor support for Oxfam has dwindled as donors decided they were unhappy to see their generosity used to obtain sexual favours for some Oxfam staff, and a number of Oxfam's celebrity ambassadors have resigned. More than a hundred claims of sexual abuse or harassment of young staff at Oxfam shops in the last nine years have been recorded.

The African charity ONE, founded by rock artist Bono has also been in the public eye with allegations that its chief executive Sipho Moyo, offered one of her young female members of staff to a 60 year-old Tanzanian politician for sex, and then demoted her and slashed her salary when she refused to get involved. Further allegations of bullying at ONE's African office have seen made and the charity is backed by celebrities Brad Pitt, Tom Hanks and George Clooney, with the UK's former prime minister David Cameron as a former board member.

 

WILL THEY/WONT THEY?
In the wake of the collapse of the President's Club after a stag event at which female hostesses were groped and propositioned and sex workers were said to circulate, Great Ormond Street Hospital claimed that it would pay back charitable donations made by the club, thought to total more than £500,000.

This was because they did not wish their good name to be associated with the sleazy goings-on. However since then they have paused to reconsider their position in the light of donor threats to withdraw support and questions such as why innocent and sick children should suffer because of the scandal.

The "dirty money" dilemma is certainly one classic one faced by the sector, and it will be interesting to see how GOSH resolves it (reader's views welcome)

 

PROBE AT ROYAL ALBERT HALL
The management of the Royal Albert Hall is to face an overdue and judge-led inquiry later this year into why the charity allows its trustees to own seats privately and then to profit from selling tickets for them at significantly inflated prices.

The inquiry will establish whether or not the considerable private gain is acceptable for trustees controlling the hall. If it is not then the Charity Commission has the power to replace the trustees and appoint their own independent ones to run the hall.

 

BETTING FRENZY ENDANGERING CHILDREN
The number of advertisements for betting firms during sports matches, and the number of sports pundits extolling their products is worrying gambling charities which are concerned about the effect of these items in hooking children into gambling.

Since the last Labour government relaxed laws governing the broadcast of ads encouraging betting the number seen by children has tripled, with many ads urging bets on football matches screened before the 9.00pm watershed.

The other problem is the number of sports pundits who now act as ambassadors, or paid pushers, to betting firms, with Alan Shearer pushing Coral and Jermaine Jenas pushing Unibet. Meanwhile Robbie Savage promotes William Hill on Twitter and Michael Vaughan promotes bookmaker Mr Green.

Some football clubs themselves have ads for gambling on football shirts sold to under-18's.

Figures produced in 2016 by charity GambleAware show that problem gamblers cost the UK taxpayer up to £1.2 billion a year. Betting firms are the biggest suppliers of gifts to UK MP's

 

BETTING FUNDED BY FRAUD
The chief executive of an animal shelter who plundered donations of £640,000 in nine years to fund his online gambling habit has been jailed for five years.

Simon Price, 53, diverted cash from legacies left to Birmingham Dogs Home to pay for his losses on his Betfair online account. He also raised money with fake invoices from solicitors, construction companies and marketing companies. He admitted multiple counts of fraud by abuse of position.. Sentencing Price Judge Patrick Thomas QC told him that his crimes, "while in the grip of a gambling addiction" had "weakened public confidence in the work of the dog's home.

Price's wife Alayna, 39, also admitted helping herself to £254,000 of the charity's money whilst working as its head of fundraising, and using it to pay off a loan, credit card debts and her wedding to Simon Price six weeks before they were arrested. She was given a two year suspended sentence as she had already paid back half of the money she stole.

Two West Midlands properties owned by the couple, who have now split up, have been seized by the police and will be sold to pay back more money to the charity.

 

IS THAT FAUX FUR OR FOX FUR YOU ARE WEARING?
Tests carried out by the Humane Society UK have revealed that real animal for is being misleadingly passed off as faux fur on a number of clothing items sold in Britain.

Researchers found:

o Fox fur trim on the hoods of coats sold by TK Maxx and Amazon.

o Fox fur on a bobble hat sold by brand Miss Bardo.

o Mink fur on earrings sold by online store Boohoo.

o Rabbit fur on shoes from Boohoo

o Rabbit fur on shoes and scarves at Amazon.

o Rabbit fur on keychains from online stores Not On The High Street and Groupon.

Fur farms, where animals endure "Appalling deprivation" were banned in the UK in 2,000 but fur farms in Russia, Poland and China are still sources.

 

THERESA GETS IT RIGHT, FOR MOST
The League Against Cruel Sports has welcomed the U-turn by Theresa May over her promise of an MP's vote on overturning the ban on using dogs for hunting wild animals in England and Wales. The ban was introduced by the Hunting Act 2004, and by the Labour government of the time.

Mrs May, a supporter of foxhunting, said she had heard "the clear message" that most voters did not support the "sport" and said that there would be "No vote in this parliament".

The League Against Cruel Sports commented that "the Government now accepts that cruel sports should no longer be a part of 21st century society".

 

FROM OUR READERS

From Robert Parker Information Commissioners Office
GDPR FAQs

Hi there.

We’ve drafted an FAQ based on questions that we are getting from charities – any interest?

Web: ico.org.uk/for-organisations/charity/charities-faqs/

Robert Parker
Head of Corporate Affairs
Information Commissioner’s Office

Editor's response
Thanks for that Robert. We'll draw our reader's attention to it by publication of your email.

Thanks again
Peter Cotterell

 

From Rob Cobley
Confused?

Hello can you kindly help me please?

I am Chair of our local Community Centre which is also a registered charity.

Our Lease states that
To use the premises only as a Village Hall or Community Centre in accordance with the terms of the Community Charity”

Our Constitution states
Community Constitution as agreed with the Charities Commission states that “the Association shall be Non-Party in Politics and Non-Sectarian, in its promotion of benefits to the inhabitants of the village and neighbourhood”,

Questions
So if our local Labour Party asks to hold a fundraiser should we say yes or no? How about their AGM?

If local UKIP or Conservative party request to book the hall and it is free to hold their AGM or just a meeting of members do we say yes we can do that?
Or sorry no?
And what if they ask can we book every month for a members meeting?

What about a baptism party? Do we have to check their religion? Or if their priest is attending and saying prayers...

Or a local Christian group want to book for a fundraiser? Or a religious service?
What if a local religious group want to hold training over a 6 weeks course? Or book on a regular basis – when the hall is free?

We are confused as we have a differing of understanding from one Trustee and hope that you might be able to advise us please?

I do hope that you can kindly point me in the right direction!

My very best regards,
Rob

Response from Dorothy Woods, with thanks
Note to Mark Ely for Charity Matters

I am Chairman of a Village Hall and Recreation Ground. We are also a registered charity.

Our Lease/Deed agreement in conjunction with the requirements of the Charity Commission states that the hall and recreation ground is for the use of the inhabitants of the Parish without distinction of political, religious or other opinions including use for meetings, lectures and classes and for other forms of recreation and leisure time occupation with the object of improving conditions of life for the said inhabitants.

We take bookings for the hire of the hall and grounds as per above. We do NOT get involved in the politics of any hirers nor do we discriminate against any groups/religions wishing to hire the hall. All hirers are given a copy of our Terms and Conditions on booking. This has worked out very satisfactorily for a number of years.

Dorothy Woods

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The views of the editor are not necessarily those of the publishers.

Editor:
Peter Cotterell
Tel: 01767 312986

peter.cotterell@eou.org.uk

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